These orange gummies are made to exacting standards of quality, right down to the use of grass-fed gelatin. When eating Paleo you’ll have to get used to the process of being very discerning with the types of products you buy and consume. It’s almost like starting a revolution against the world around you since so much of what you see in stores and at restaurants is not Paleo, and has either been genetically modified or is conventionally grown. This recipe exemplifies the sort of pickiness you have to have about what goes in your body. At the same time it provides a yummy orange-flavored snack that’s great anytime.

Get rid of the temptation – if you’re gonna go at this thing with a full head of steam, remove all the junk food from your house.  It’s going to take a few weeks for your body to adjust to burning fat instead of glucose, and you might want to eat poorly here and there. If there’s no food in your house to tempt you, it will be much easier to stay on target.
[…] Y’all, I like to cook but I love to bake. More times than not I change recipes to make them my own. I can’t tell you exactly how I change them because oftentimes I don’t remember. I only remember how good they were. My two go-to desserts have been gluten free with no processed sugar. They are made with almond flour and coconut sugar instead. The coconut sugar is surprisingly really good in these recipes. I believe it can act much like brown sugar as its dark in color. It doesn’t give a coconut taste at all and it doesn’t taste like sugar. It’s interesting. It’s low glycemic which is awesome. The two recipes I use are: Chocolate Chip Cookies […]

In a nutshell, Paleo lifestyle and diet take inspiration and cues from our ancestors and the way we used to eat and live. Let’s get one thing clear: it’s not about re-enacting the caveman era. Nobody runs around in in loincloths and sets fires to cook their food (only occasionally). Paleo is about learning from ancestors but it is mostly fuelled by modern scientific and medical research and common sense.


Don’t let the fact that these cookies are Paleo make you think they don’t taste good. These are now my very favorite cookie! They taste like a legit cookie you would get at a bakery. Crispy on the outer edges, just the slightest bit soft and gooey in the center. And since there is no flour, the cookie has an intense almond butter flavor that I can’t get enough of.
This could be the perfect trail mix. It’s full of crunch from a variety of nuts, sweetness from coconut flakes and banana chips and just the right amount of chocolate to curb those cravings. It comes together right in the slow cooker, so your kitchen will smell amazing! Be sure to use coconut oil or ghee instead of butter here to keep it strictly Paleo.
These little sandwiches are really pushing the limits of a conventional sandwich. Bacon is serving as the “bread” and guacamole is the thing getting sandwiched. Avocados are bona fide superfood, and contain plenty of potassium, fiber, and healthy fat. Bacon is often the scourge of most diet plans, but on Paleo it is allowed so why not dig in? The two go really well together, and you’ll often find them as add-ons to deli sandwiches because they simply taste that good.
Vanilla is the last ingredient in the cookies. (Yep, these almond cookies only have four ingredients. I know! Crazy, right?) You use a generous amount of vanilla extract! Two teaspoons. However, since the almond and maple bring such strong, lovely flavors to the table, the vanilla extract needs a little boost to get noticed. If you don’t love vanilla, reduce it to one teaspoon or omit completely. (If you omit, add two additional teaspoons of maple syrup to the recipe.)
Let me introduce myself. My name is Mark Sisson. I’m 63 years young. I live and work in Malibu, California. In a past life I was a professional marathoner and triathlete. Now my life goal is to help 100 million people get healthy. I started this blog in 2006 to empower people to take full responsibility for their own health and enjoyment of life by investigating, discussing, and critically rethinking everything we’ve assumed to be true about health and wellness...
Surprised there are chocolate chip waffles on this list? Once you glance at the ingredients, you won’t be—Know Better is a paleo-friendly brand that makes grain-free, gluten-free, and protein-packed baked goods with coconut flour, chia seeds, and egg whites for added protein. These chocolate chip waffles also contain no added sugars; the chocolate chips are made from cacao and allulose. Enjoy them topped with almond butter for a seriously satisfying snack.
These veggie roll ups are great to make ahead of time, and it’s a good idea to plan snacks into your day, rather than waiting until you get hungry and then frantically making something. Cucumber acts as the roll, and a tomato is the prize inside. Cashews act as a nice filling to help hold it all together, once they get blended up into a sort of paste. Olive oil, garlic, sea salt and basil are all Paleo goodies, so you can feel totally fine by having this as a snack anytime you get hungry and it’s not time for a full meal.

Hi Brenda. I haven’t tried using a sugar replacement in these cookies, but I would definitely try a granulated sugar replacement (like Xylitol and Splenda) as opposed to the drops. Coconut flour is much more absorbent than almond flour so I would not recommend using it in these cookies. As long as the SF chocolate is OK for baking, that will be totally fine. Good luck!
Dairy is a touchy subject. It’s widely considered a gray area in the Paleo community. Much of the world’s population cannot tolerate lactose, the sugar found in milk. Mass commercially-produced milk comes from industrially farmed cows, undesirable from both a health and ethical standpoint. That said, grass-fed and pasture-raised cows produce higher-quality milk. Fermented dairy, like yogurt and kefir, also offers the benefits of probiotics. If you choose to consume dairy, opt for the quality stuff. Otherwise, try additive-free nut and coconut milks.
If you're interested in the paleo plan but don't think you want to be so strict, you don't have to be all-or-nothing with your approach. Consider adopting some eating patterns from paleo and skipping the ones that don't work for you. For example, try just eating more fruits and vegetables and cutting down on added sugars. If you feel unsure about grains or dairy, talk to your doctor or a registered dietitian to determine what's best for your body.
Roll the dough into 8 (75-gram) balls and place the remaining 1/4 cup (43 grams) of chocolate chips on the top and on the sides of the dough balls. You can also roll them into 16 smaller balls but then you need to adjust the baking time (a few minutes less than recommended below). Place 4" apart on the prepared baking sheet. Press the cookies down lightly with the palm of your hand.
With grains excluded from the Paleo diet, nuts and seeds are popular replacements in Paleo versions of bread, cereals, pies, cakes and other baked goods. They form the basis of many dairy-free milks, flours and nut butters. They’re also incredibly popular and sustaining snacks and salad toppings. While nuts open up a range of previously non-Paleo offerings, they’re nevertheless high in calories and undesirable phytic acid. Consume them mindfully. 

There’s evidence that our ancestors pressed olives to make antioxidant-rich olive oil as far back as 7,000 years ago. Therefore, olive oil is considered to be a paleo ingredient and rightly so as it’s exceptional nutritional profile provides us with numerous benefits. With a unique mix of oleic acid and monounsaturated fatty acids, using olive oil raw or in low-heat cooking applications has been shown to decrease the risk of developing cancer, diabetes, osteoporosis and Alzheimer’s.
Sure, there's a bit of debate as to whether true Paleo-ers can have foods like chocolate (which is made with milk solids and sugar). As articulated on Paleo Leap, an online resource for all things Paleo, "In the true sense of whether our Paleolithic ancestors enjoyed [foods like chocolate], the answer is almost always no, but the real question we should ask ourselves is whether they are healthy when consumed in moderation." In essence, it's up to the individual to decide whether or not to include chocolate in their nutritional regime. Paleo-ers who do say yes to chocolate often choose the dark variety -- it tends to be less processed and lower in sugar.
Ive made a cople of your desserts now and have been SO impressed!!!!! Thank you for these great recipes!! My husband eats Paleo so I wanted to test these out for him today. Between my parents and my 4 yr old son, they ate almost the whole batch!! My dad even loved them and he has been known to eat 6 crispy kremes in one sitting without thinking twice! 😉 I used our blendtec blender to grind some raw almonds into flour (hadn’t tried that before) and with that the cookies came out delicious!! Thank you for sharing!
Your Gut Health. A critical review(Valle G et al, 2017 ) evaluating paleo’s effect on the human gut microbiome in both hunter-gatherers and modern adherents concluded that a paleolithic template is connected to enhancing healthier and more diverse gut bacteria, as opposed to those that follow the Standard American Diets (Conlon & Bird, 2014).Why does this matter? You gut microbiome is made up of trillions of bacteria (both good and bad) that has a major influence on your metabolism, hormones, digestion, immune system and mood.

Use the chart below to build the perfect snack. Your goal: hit at least two out of the three columns. Achieve ultimate snacking success by hitting all three columns! Doing this will not only provide you with essential macro- and micronutrients that will keep you healthy and your body functioning optimally, but it will also ensure you stay satiated until your next meal.
Because humans were hunter-gatherers for hundreds of thousands of years, we evolved to use and favor the diverse plant and rich meat intake of our hunting and foraging history. Farming and its core crops (e.g. grains), by contrast, only came on the scene approximately 10,000 years ago and took at least 8000 of those years to spread across the world. Our evolutionary roots—and residual genetic expectations—favor the nutritional practices of our hunter-gatherer legacy. (For more on the history of the paleo diet, click here.)

While they’re technically a fruit, avocados contain monounsaturated, polyunsaturated and saturated fats which provide a good source of energy while lowering ‘bad’ cholesterol and creating healthy skin, hair and nails. However, they’re also full of vitamins, minerals and antioxidants including vitamin B’s, C, K, E, copper and potassium to nourish your body and protect it from disease-causing and inflammatory free radicals. Add to all of this goodness with the high level of fiber for a healthy digestive system and you’ve got an incredibly nutritious paleo-approved ingredient to add to almost any meal.
While they’re technically a fruit, avocados contain monounsaturated, polyunsaturated and saturated fats which provide a good source of energy while lowering ‘bad’ cholesterol and creating healthy skin, hair and nails. However, they’re also full of vitamins, minerals and antioxidants including vitamin B’s, C, K, E, copper and potassium to nourish your body and protect it from disease-causing and inflammatory free radicals. Add to all of this goodness with the high level of fiber for a healthy digestive system and you’ve got an incredibly nutritious paleo-approved ingredient to add to almost any meal.
Archaeological research indicates that our Paleolithic ancestors gleaned the lion’s share of their calories and nutrition from meat, in stark comparison to modern day Western diets. Studies of today’s remaining hunter-gatherer societies show that meat and other animal products comprise a whopping 65% of their total caloric intake, whereas current day Western protein intakes average in at a measly 15% of total calories.
Like land animals, sea animals serve as a healthy source of protein as well as a variety of micronutrients. Many fish offer a solid dose of omega-3 fatty acids (to be consumed in moderation and balanced with omega-6 fatty acids) and essential vitamins and nutrients. Be sure to purchase seafood that’s sustainably sourced and try to avoid fish heavily exposed to environmental toxins.
Archaeological research indicates that our Paleolithic ancestors gleaned the lion’s share of their calories and nutrition from meat, in stark comparison to modern day Western diets. Studies of today’s remaining hunter-gatherer societies show that meat and other animal products comprise a whopping 65% of their total caloric intake, whereas current day Western protein intakes average in at a measly 15% of total calories.
Because it came from an animal, practically all meats are paleo. However, it’s important to look for meats that are as natural as possible. This means that on the paleo diet you should opt for grass fed, wild-caught and organic varieties. Not only do these have a superior nutritional profile, they’re also less likely to be full of harmful preservatives, antibiotics, steroids and pesticides which are commonly added to animal feed. You’ll also want to avoid meats that have been highly processed such as hot dogs, spam and lunch meats. The added preservatives, flavor enhances and sugar in these foods have been linked to increased risk of developing cancer and heart disease.
Absolutely a 5 star cookie. I’m still getting over how balanced they are: plenty sweet, light texture (crispy yet soft, almost like a shortbread) and satisfying. I’ve made other recipes with almond flour and was starting to get discouraged b/c they tasted too nutty, like they had an aftertaste. And while I prefer to use unrefined sugar, I don’t care for honey in cookies or cakes. Thank you, Megan. This is the go-to cookie I’ve been looking for. I made a double batch and just added a little grape seed oil b/c I ran out of coconut oil.
Hi Dave, sorry for your troubles! More likely than not, the problem is that your almond flour is too coarse. I’ve added a link in the recipe with the brand I recommend (Honeyville) – it’s blanched and very fine and acts much more similarly to a traditional wheat flour than some coarser almond flours/meals do. In the meantime, you could try baking the cookie dough you have in a pan to make blondies so it doesn’t go to waste. Hope it still tastes delicious! Happy New Year.
Primarily aimed at reducing inflammation, balancing blood sugar and hormones, and increasing cognitive performance, all achieved by improving fat metabolism. Based around the popular “Bulletproof Coffee.” Bulletproof differs from Paleo because of its emphasis on “Bulletproof” supplements and shunning of higher carbohydrate foods like fruit and tubers. The Bulletproof Diet lies somewhere between Keto and Paleo. Check out The Bulletproof Diet by Dave Asprey.

This recipe was the hands down winner. It was contestant “D” of A-D. My husband had decided on B, I think, until he tried these and he declared this recipe the winner on the spot. I tried them and agreed. I now feel sick from trying all of these cookies, but I can give this recipe the thumbs up all around from my household! The cookie party ladies will hopefully appreciate all of my research. :) In all seriousness, if you need a low-allergen, “healthier” choc chip cookie recipe that won’t fail, this is the one. Winner-winner, choc chip cookie dinner! (Which is what I had tonight… vurp…)
This is a classic gingerbread cookie recipe Paleo-style. Yup, you could make these and decorate your tree with them and eat a few too. You could make these and give them away to your friends and neighbors if you do that sort of thing. Whatever you do with them you will have so much fun because you can actually make and eat gingerbread cookies like everyone else now. Yeah, for eating “normal” even when you are on a Paleo diet.
2017 Update: these Paleo Chocolate Chip Cookies are the BOMB, and one of my favorite/your favorite recipes on the site. You guys seriously LOVE this one, and I don’t blame you. They’re so good. But…they also needed a photo update, so I’m republishing the post with the new photos! Unfortunately, I’m long out of college, but leaving the original post written below for nostalgia’s sake. Enjoy!!
2017 Update: these Paleo Chocolate Chip Cookies are the BOMB, and one of my favorite/your favorite recipes on the site. You guys seriously LOVE this one, and I don’t blame you. They’re so good. But…they also needed a photo update, so I’m republishing the post with the new photos! Unfortunately, I’m long out of college, but leaving the original post written below for nostalgia’s sake. Enjoy!!
Hi Dave, sorry for your troubles! More likely than not, the problem is that your almond flour is too coarse. I’ve added a link in the recipe with the brand I recommend (Honeyville) – it’s blanched and very fine and acts much more similarly to a traditional wheat flour than some coarser almond flours/meals do. In the meantime, you could try baking the cookie dough you have in a pan to make blondies so it doesn’t go to waste. Hope it still tastes delicious! Happy New Year.
I’ve somehow managed to keep baking, and blogging, and photographing, and writing, through every year and step of college. In some ways, I think my college career would have been different if I hadn’t been committed to Bakerita. Bakerita is my totally my creative outlet, and without this outlet, and without being able to chat and connect with all of you…the past few years would’ve been pretty different.
DIY roasted nuts are easier than you’d think—all you need is a bag of mixed nuts, an egg white, and go-to spices: sea salt, pepper, rosemary, sage, garlic powder, and paprika. Coat the nuts in the egg white in one bowl, and mix all the spices in another. Pour the spice mix over the nuts, transfer to a baking sheet lined with foil or parchment paper, and roast for 16 minutes.
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