2017 Update: these Paleo Chocolate Chip Cookies are the BOMB, and one of my favorite/your favorite recipes on the site. You guys seriously LOVE this one, and I don’t blame you. They’re so good. But…they also needed a photo update, so I’m republishing the post with the new photos! Unfortunately, I’m long out of college, but leaving the original post written below for nostalgia’s sake. Enjoy!!
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If you have more questions on specific foods, we’ve included a comprehensive list of paleo diet foods below. We’ve provided a list of the foods that are allowed on the paleo diet. We’ve also broken this list down into the specific food groups, so you can see which meats, vegetables, fruits, nuts, and fats are on the paleo diet. In addition to all of that, we’ve also included a comprehensive list of foods not allowed on the paleo diet.
Hi Julie. Chocolate chip cookies without any sugar or chocolate wouldn’t really taste like chocolate chip cookies anymore…you could try substituting a calorie-free sweetener for the sugar if that’s what you’re looking for. Since cacao mass has no sweetener, I imagine it would be pretty bitter in cookies, but you could give it a shot – I’ve never used it before so I’m unsure of how it will work.
Pumpkin seeds are one of the healthiest seeds you can eat, and making them taste as good as they can means you’ll be more inclined to eat them, and therefore more likely to benefit from the nutrients they contain. This recipe uses real jalapenos to deliver the heat, and keeps things elegant by only using the requisite number of ingredients to get these to taste right. For example, there’s olive oil, which is used to help roast the seeds, but it also helps the paprika and salt stick to the seeds so you get flavor on each one.
In a nutshell, Paleo lifestyle and diet take inspiration and cues from our ancestors and the way we used to eat and live. Let’s get one thing clear: it’s not about re-enacting the caveman era. Nobody runs around in in loincloths and sets fires to cook their food (only occasionally). Paleo is about learning from ancestors but it is mostly fuelled by modern scientific and medical research and common sense.

This leafy green is packed full of essential nutrients including vitamin C, A, E, K, B6, folate, potassium, manganese, thiamin, riboflavin, calcium and iron, to name just a few. Because of this, broccoli is a great addition to almost any paleo meal and has also been shown to be particularly beneficial in reducing the risk of developing certain types of cancers due to its anti-inflammatory and detoxifying nature.


Eating clean or following the Paleo diet involves eating mainly fruits, vegetables, nuts, seeds, eggs, meat, poultry and seafood. When eating clean, you can also consume legumes, whole grains and low-fat dairy products, giving you more variety in your diet. Moderate amounts of dark chocolate, red wine and unrefined sweeteners -- like honey and maple syrup -- are also allowed.
Avocados make a great snack all by themselves, but they can be a little bland sometimes, and this is a great way to doll them up so they’re even tastier. This uses Greek yogurt, which is a fermented form of dairy and considered acceptable by some following the Paleo plan. Others see it as dairy is dairy and don’t eat it, so it’s up to you to decide if you want to incorporate a bit of fermented dairy like Greek yogurt into your diet or not. The rest of the recipe is just a bit of seasoning to help the avocado out in the flavor department.
Sure, there's a bit of debate as to whether true Paleo-ers can have foods like chocolate (which is made with milk solids and sugar). As articulated on Paleo Leap, an online resource for all things Paleo, "In the true sense of whether our Paleolithic ancestors enjoyed [foods like chocolate], the answer is almost always no, but the real question we should ask ourselves is whether they are healthy when consumed in moderation." In essence, it's up to the individual to decide whether or not to include chocolate in their nutritional regime. Paleo-ers who do say yes to chocolate often choose the dark variety -- it tends to be less processed and lower in sugar.
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