A very strict 30 day elimination diet founded on Paleo principles, the goal of which is to fight food addiction and help identify problematic foods on an individual level. Promotes whole, real foods, shuns all processed foods, including those made with “Paleo” ingredients. Check out the books It Starts With Food and The Whole30 by Melissa Hartwig and Dallas Hartwig for more information.

Hi Anne- thank you for trying them! Coconut sugar in very low glycemic so it’s much better for blood sugar than traditional sugar (of course), but even honey or maple syrup. I do understand that some people have to have sugar free though. I’m not familiar with stevia and I don’t think it converts 1:1. I have had good luck with Swerve sweetener which does evenly convert in recipes and I would suggest she tried that. It’s found in the baking aisle and of course on Amazon. Hope that helps!


These orange gummies are made to exacting standards of quality, right down to the use of grass-fed gelatin. When eating Paleo you’ll have to get used to the process of being very discerning with the types of products you buy and consume. It’s almost like starting a revolution against the world around you since so much of what you see in stores and at restaurants is not Paleo, and has either been genetically modified or is conventionally grown. This recipe exemplifies the sort of pickiness you have to have about what goes in your body. At the same time it provides a yummy orange-flavored snack that’s great anytime.
Condiments – mustard, fish good, quality vinegars such as Apple Cider with mother in it or aged Balsamic, olive oil mayonnaise, low sugar tomato sauces and paste, anchovies, olives, gherkins, capers, salsas and pestos – are all fine, just make sure no nasty chemicals and preservatives are added. Wheat free soy sauce such as Tamari and naturally derived oyster sauce are ok every now and again but it’s better to try something like coconut aminos. 

[…] Y’all, I like to cook but I love to bake. More times than not I change recipes to make them my own. I can’t tell you exactly how I change them because oftentimes I don’t remember. I only remember how good they were. My two go-to desserts have been gluten free with no processed sugar. They are made with almond flour and coconut sugar instead. The coconut sugar is surprisingly really good in these recipes. I believe it can act much like brown sugar as its dark in color. It doesn’t give a coconut taste at all and it doesn’t taste like sugar. It’s interesting. It’s low glycemic which is awesome. The two recipes I use are: Chocolate Chip Cookies […]
I’m vegan, and my boyfriend is (mostly) paleo. As soon as November hit I got a serious craving for chocolate chip cookies! I wanted to make something we could both enjoy, and after much research, I landed here. My guy is a chef, so he’s quite the critic. Until NOW, I haven’t been able to impress him with vegan/grain free cookies. This recipe is perfect! I made my own almond butter (wouldn’t have if I hadn’t run out…a blessing in disguise!), and used the coconut sugar, chilling it like you said. Luckily I didn’t bake them all at once, or they’d be gone! Thank you for this! :)
Sure, there's a bit of debate as to whether true Paleo-ers can have foods like chocolate (which is made with milk solids and sugar). As articulated on Paleo Leap, an online resource for all things Paleo, "In the true sense of whether our Paleolithic ancestors enjoyed [foods like chocolate], the answer is almost always no, but the real question we should ask ourselves is whether they are healthy when consumed in moderation." In essence, it's up to the individual to decide whether or not to include chocolate in their nutritional regime. Paleo-ers who do say yes to chocolate often choose the dark variety -- it tends to be less processed and lower in sugar.
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