Legumes are members of a large family of plants that have a seed or pod. This category includes all beans, peas, lentils, tofu and other soyfoods, and peanuts. Legumes are not allowed on paleo because of their high content of lectins and phytic acid. Similar to grains, this is a point of controversy in the scientific community. In fact, lots of research supports eating legumes as part of a healthy diet because they are low in fat and high in fiber, protein and iron.
A strict paleo diet does not allow dairy products because hunter-gatherers did not milk cows. Some paleo dieters say dairy is OK, especially if it is grass-fed because grass-fed butter, for example, has more omega-3s. Fermented dairy products are also OK for some paleo eaters because they have a lower content of lactose and casein, the two concerns paleo dieters have with dairy.
As paleo guru Robb Wolf puts it, think of a 100-yard football field. The first 99.5 yards are how long Homo-Sapiens spent as hunter-gatherers. As they became REALLY good at hunting and gathering our bodies adapted to that lifestyle over thousands of years. That last half-yard represents our species after the agricultural revolution, where our diet has shifted (but our genetics haven’t).
The paleo diet eliminates dairy because its advocates say many people are lactose intolerant, and because eating dairy has been associated with Crohn’s disease, among other claims. (4) While you wouldn’t want to eat lactose (a sugar found in dairy) if your body can’t tolerate it, there’s no proof that eating dairy causes Crohn’s or worsens symptoms in those who have been diagnosed. (5)
Chelsea is the site editor and nutritionist for Ultimate Paleo Guide and Paleo Meal Plans. In 2016, Chelsea graduated from the National University of Natural Medicine with a Master’s degree in Nutrition. When she’s not working for Ultimate Paleo Guide or coaching CrossFit, Chelsea enjoys hiking, traveling, cooking, and eating. You can keep up with her on Instagram at @chelsbrinegar and LinkedIn.

Now, there are lots of people who feel iffy about snacking. And I get that. The snacks many of us were brought up and traditionally reach for (animal crackers, pretzels, cheese flavored crackers) are kind of just filling up the belly instead of actually feeding the body what it is actually asking for...which is nutrients and protein! Since moving our family to a mostly-Paleo way of eating a few years ago, our snacking game has totally changed!  Out with the starchy crackers. In with real food, nutrient dense nibbles! Nibbles that a little growing body will actually put to good use! That will actually keep them going until their next meal....with their sanity (and your's) intact.
The perfect cookie for a winter themed, “Frozen” themed or even a Christmas party. Kids love them, especially little girls that love the movie “Frozen”. They are made with only a few ingredients so they are pretty easy to make. I made mine by using a piping bag and a large star tip so you don’t need a cookie press unless you already have one or want to buy one. They are like a crisp butter cookie with almost a shortbread texture. The coconut palm sugar is the only sweetener that will achieve a crisp cookie. So don’t try to replace it with Honey or Maple Syrup.
So happy to hear you enjoyed the cookies, Jane! Coconut sugar is one of my favorites, and has a very low glycemic index so it doesn’t spike your blood sugar too much. It is a bit sweet, so you can definitely cut down on the sugar next time you make them if you taste buds prefer. Thanks so much for subscribing, I hope you find lots of recipes here to love.
Let’s get this out of the way upfront: I know calling a cookie recipe the “world’s easiest” sounds a bit ridiculous, but I can explain. The name started out innocently enough — one day, I created an easy-to-make almond cookie recipe. I adored this recipe. In my excitement, I’d say to friends, “You have to try these almond cookies; they’re, like, the world’s easiest cookies.” And well, the name stuck.
These sweet potato chips do a great job of filling in for regular potato chips. They have the same texture you’re looking for, both as you pick them up and once you put them in your mouth. The sea salt ensures that they’re salty enough to satisfy, and the rosemary gives them a distinct flavor that really plays well with the sweet potato. And of course sweet potatoes bring a lot more to the table in regards to nutrients and fiber, so you’re actually helping yourself along with these rather than with potato chips that will only set you back.
These sweet potato chips do a great job of filling in for regular potato chips. They have the same texture you’re looking for, both as you pick them up and once you put them in your mouth. The sea salt ensures that they’re salty enough to satisfy, and the rosemary gives them a distinct flavor that really plays well with the sweet potato. And of course sweet potatoes bring a lot more to the table in regards to nutrients and fiber, so you’re actually helping yourself along with these rather than with potato chips that will only set you back.

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Delicious – followed the recipe exactly only mine did not go down flat. Perhaps the nut butter was a bit dry? Anyhow, when I checked on the first tray they were still very perky and round so I quickly smooshed them with a fork and they were a bit cracked but held together well and were tasty. For the second batch, pressed them first with a fork and they puffed up nicely leaving classic peanut butter cookie marks. Will definitely make again.
As discussed in my article questioning nut consumption on a Paleo diet, macadamia nuts are probably the healthiest nuts available because of their high monounsaturated and low polyunsaturated fat content as well as their low levels of anti-nutrients. They can thus be enjoyed without guilt. This hummus recipe is great with anything where you would normally use regular hummus or Baba Ghanoush.
Yes, I’ve used half coconut flour. Still in the oven but they tasted good before I put them in! I also found them too crumbly the first time I made them, so I added a flax egg and half a cup of almond milk and then squeezed them into balls and flattened them. Much better consistency. And I find they need to bake 2-3 minutes longer, maybe even a bit more.
So I’m not one to make my food in football shapes. Or use dye to color my food in my favorite teams colors. Probably because I don’t have a favorite team. But my home states team (the Broncos) are in the Superbowl this year so I’m obligated to act excited. I’d honestly rather just be moving into my new apartment and organizing crap than watching to game. But for social stigmas and reasons, I will be watching to game. Mainly so I can snack on food all day long and it’s not considered binge eating. Thanks, Superbowl.
Legumes – beans, lentils, chickpeas and so on. Cashews are not legumes! There are some debates over whether some legumes are safe to consume in moderation, if prepared properly (soaked for 12 hours and then cooked really well to remove the phytic acid and make them easier to digest). You can read this article by Dr. Chris Kresser and this article by Dr. Loren Cordain and make up your own mind like we do. We include green beans and peas but avoid the rest.
Here’s an interesting take on hummus, which is necessary because traditional hummus is not something you can have on Paleo. They’ve replaced the garbanzo beans (aka chickpeas) with a combination of zucchini and avocado, and the result is something that looks a lot like hummus, and tastes really good too. All of the other ingredients in hummus are present, like garlic, tahini, lemon juice, and cumin, so as long as you’re not a hummus snob you should be pleasantly surprised by this concoction.
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