Missing your favorite chocolate and nut snack bar? Now you can enjoy a sweet treat that tastes like a decadent dessert with Caveman’s dark chocolate almond coconut bars. The perfect mix of sweet and salty, these certified “Paleo-Friendly” bars are filled with hearty almonds, sunflower seeds, and cashews and coated in chocolate. Munch on one in between meals or save it for dessert.


Unlike many traditional stuffed pepper recipes, these stuffed bell peppers are stuffed with things you might actually eat while watching the big game. Basically it entails mixing up a batch of buffalo chicken salad, complete with chicken, hot sauce, and bleu cheese, and then stuffing them into a pepper. This means you’ll be getting a nice balance of vegetables and meat, as well as that classic buffalo flavor with the hot sauce and bleu cheese. Plenty of protein in this snack that eats like a meal if you need it to.
The second my mom saw these, she immediately started making plans to hide and portion them. She has the same problem I do with, ya know, not eating the whole batch. In one sitting. She gushed over them, and asked me, “HOW do you do it??” And I’m like, “HOW do you cook so well?!” My mom thinks it’s the funniest thing in the world that she cooks savory food like a boss, and I pretty much exclusively bake.
This is a classic gingerbread cookie recipe Paleo-style. Yup, you could make these and decorate your tree with them and eat a few too. You could make these and give them away to your friends and neighbors if you do that sort of thing. Whatever you do with them you will have so much fun because you can actually make and eat gingerbread cookies like everyone else now. Yeah, for eating “normal” even when you are on a Paleo diet.
This recipe is using grass-fed ricotta cheese stuffed into strawberries, which are then wrapped in proscuitto. The ricotta cheese will be an issue for those strictly following the no dairy rule, while others may choose to give it a pass because it comes from grass-fed cows. Many food items on Paleo fall into a gray area, and it is up to the individual to decide how far they want to take it, and how their body processes these types of foods. You end up getting a meaty, fruity, cheesy mouthful, which is sure to make a great snack or appetizer for a party.
With grains excluded from the Paleo diet, nuts and seeds are popular replacements in Paleo versions of bread, cereals, pies, cakes and other baked goods. They form the basis of many dairy-free milks, flours and nut butters. They’re also incredibly popular and sustaining snacks and salad toppings. While nuts open up a range of previously non-Paleo offerings, they’re nevertheless high in calories and undesirable phytic acid. Consume them mindfully. 

Generally, vegetables are dense in fiber and essential vitamins and minerals and are thus a required part of a balanced Paleo diet. Balance is key here: vegetables, while essential, are best consumed alongside a variety of food groups. They, nor any other food group, cannot alone constitute a healthy diet. More than that, not all vegetables are created equal, nutrition-wise. They are, however, delicious and provide tons of creative opportunities to diversify your diet!
It doesn’t matter if you’re Paleo or not — you’re going to want to make these nachos! You’ll start with homemade sweet potato chips, then load ’em up with shredded chicken, pico de gallo and chilies. But the star of this dish is the avocado sauce. It’s your cheese stand-in but trust me, you’re going to want to eat it all the time. A mix of avocado, mayo, lime juice, jalapeño, garlic and cilantro, this will be your new favorite sauce. Serve these on game day, movie night or anytime, really!
These gummy snacks are billed as being anti-inflammatory and use a host of ingredients that have been shown to help curb inflammation in the body, namely turmeric and ginger. The way they’ve made these into gummy form is through the use of gelatin, which is definitely a go on Paleo. There’s also other healthy items to really make these a vitamin-packed snack, including citrus juice of your choice and raw honey. By using natural ingredients like raw honey you’re eating food that is as close to nature as possible.
Meat and poultry (including offal) – grass-fed, free range meat is not only a kinder and more ethical way to consume animal products but it is also much higher in nutrients because of the way the cattle was fed and raised. We have a great little interview with a cattle farmer talking about the benefits of grass-fed, pasture raised cattle meat here.
This is a complete list of foods not allowed on the paleo diet. It’s a sad day when you first have to say goodbye to these foods but, once you start, it’s much easier and you find there are even better paleo substitutes for these foods. The first few weeks might be tough, but if you stick with it over time, it’ll be worth it. We promise. Here’s the ultimate list of foods not allowed on the paleo diet.

The paleo or primal lifestyle also promotes healthier living. Better sleeping habits. Stress reduction. Functional fitness and movement. Adequate sun exposure. Spending more time outdoors. Avoiding environmental toxins and so on. Above all, paleo is not a set of strict rules, it’s more of a framework that you can adapt based on your own goals, health, gender, age, location and current lifestyle. It’s a very holistic approach to wellbeing. Read more about my practical approach to paleo here.
Hi! This might seem like an odd question, but do you think I could bake / cook these on an electric griddle? 5 mins, then a flip and 5 mins more? I am thinking to try this at preschool and want a recipe that will cater to all children, with respect to food allergies / sensitivities or parents nutritional wishes. We don’t have an oven, just the electric griddle pan. Thoughts?
Because of the simplicity of a paleo diet, it does not require participants to do too much thinking. While calories in versus calories out is the most basic rule to weight loss, a paleo diet takes a lot of thinking out of dieting. As long as you are eating whole, nutritious foods, you will probably find that weight loss will follow naturally—mainly because this style of eating cuts calories automatically.
[…] I don't like the word "diet", so I'll say that this is more a way of changing what you eat long-term. It's all based around what our ancestor hunter-gatherers would have eaten, and what we've evolved to be able to process and absorb. The very basic level of it, is that you don't eat carbohydrates, processed meats or sugars, and cut out dairy products. You instead eat plenty of fresh meat, fish, vegetables, fruits and nuts. You can still have oil, provided it's natural – so coconut, peanut & olive oil are all good. The good thing is that you're also allowed to take this to your own level – so if you want a couple of days off a week – say, weekends, you can do it & it will still be a lot healthier for you. This is a really helpful site I've used to make a note on my shopping list of what's allowed: The Ultimate Paleo Diet Food List | Ultimate Paleo Guide […]
In a large bowl, add add in beaten egg, melted and cooled coconut oil, coconut sugar and vanilla extract. (Please make sure your coconut oil is cool!) Next add in almond flour, coconut flour and baking soda, mixing well to combine and form a dough. Fold in dark chocolate chunks. You may need to use your hands to moisten the dough so that it sticks together well.
Note that any products made with any one or a combination of these grains are also off the cards. That means most breads, pastas, flours, baked goods and the majority of processed dry goods. Even if a product claims to be gluten free, it can still contain other grains (or pseudo-grains like quinoa or buckwheat) that subject the body to anti-nutrients like lectins.
In a nutshell, Paleo lifestyle and diet take inspiration and cues from our ancestors and the way we used to eat and live. Let’s get one thing clear: it’s not about re-enacting the caveman era. Nobody runs around in in loincloths and sets fires to cook their food (only occasionally). Paleo is about learning from ancestors but it is mostly fuelled by modern scientific and medical research and common sense.

As paleo guru Robb Wolf puts it, think of a 100-yard football field. The first 99.5 yards are how long Homo-Sapiens spent as hunter-gatherers. As they became REALLY good at hunting and gathering our bodies adapted to that lifestyle over thousands of years. That last half-yard represents our species after the agricultural revolution, where our diet has shifted (but our genetics haven’t).
I’ve somehow managed to keep baking, and blogging, and photographing, and writing, through every year and step of college. In some ways, I think my college career would have been different if I hadn’t been committed to Bakerita. Bakerita is my totally my creative outlet, and without this outlet, and without being able to chat and connect with all of you…the past few years would’ve been pretty different.
Protein is one of the staple sources of energy on the paleo diet. In fact, it’s likely that meat was the first food that our ancestors ate and, as such, our bodies are primed to run well on it. With a high protein content, moderate to high fat content, low or no carbs and a range of vitamins and minerals to boot, eating plenty of meat is a great way to gain or maintain lean muscle mass, boost your metabolism and make sure that you stay full between meals.
Paleo critics point out that not all grains are created equal—whole grains do not spike your blood sugar as much as refined grains. Even so, paleo dieters still steer clear of grains because they contain different compounds and proteins like gluten, lectins and phytates, which they claim cause inflammation in the body and block other nutrients from being absorbed. Paleo critics say these compounds are not a problem unless you have an allergy or sensitivity.
Meat and poultry (including offal) – grass-fed, free range meat is not only a kinder and more ethical way to consume animal products but it is also much higher in nutrients because of the way the cattle was fed and raised. We have a great little interview with a cattle farmer talking about the benefits of grass-fed, pasture raised cattle meat here.
While healthy fats, proteins, and fruits and veggies are center stage in this eating approach, processed and packaged foods — as well as all grains, legumes, soy, and dairy — are off-limits in the paleo diet. Proponents of this eating approach argue that modern farming practices and food manufacturing create foods in these categories that are bad for our bodies.
Delicious – followed the recipe exactly only mine did not go down flat. Perhaps the nut butter was a bit dry? Anyhow, when I checked on the first tray they were still very perky and round so I quickly smooshed them with a fork and they were a bit cracked but held together well and were tasty. For the second batch, pressed them first with a fork and they puffed up nicely leaving classic peanut butter cookie marks. Will definitely make again.
Whole grains are an important source of nutrition — aside from cholesterol-lowering fiber, these complex carbohydrates offer B vitamins like thiamine, riboflavin, niacin, and folate, and minerals including iron, magnesium, and selenium, Hultin says. “While the paleo diet is based on a high veggie intake with fruits included as well, its followers will be missing out on rich sources of nutrients from whole grains, soy foods, and legumes,” she says.
Nuts and seeds are rather popular snacks for both  Paleo and non-Paleo eaters.  If you aren’t careful, you can end up consuming quite a few of them because of their ease and convenience.  There’s also a whole host of health benefits you can get from nuts and seeds as most are loaded with nutrients.With high levels of antioxidants, nuts are cardio-protective and seeds on are packed with dietary fiber.   There are quite a few flavorful alternatives, sweet or savory, to consider as an alternative to your spoonful of nut butter or your handful of almonds.  Here’s a list of sweet and salty recipes to keep your tastebuds guessing and prevent boredom:

I just made these with Stevia. I replaced all coconut sugar with about 1/2 tsp Sweet Leaf Stevia powder then tasted the batter before I divided & baked. I added just a hint more stevia because (true confessions) I LOVE SUGAR! I also went heavy on the vanilla because really, stevia has a little bitter aftertaste and the vanilla helps cloak that. These are delicious. I am expecting that the swap brings the caloric value of the cookie down by approximately 30 calories/cookie if the bath made 12. I only got 10 after sampling a few spoons (heaping) of the batter.
This step is actually optional if you do not mind having flecks of zucchini visible in your zucchini cookies! However, in my house, my kids would not approve of anything green in their cookies, so I always blend the zucchini with the other wet ingredients! I also really enjoy the texture of these paleo breakfast cookies when the zucchini is fully blended.
They did not rise of consequence, but I’m not complaining since they tasted excellent and they were the treat I was seeking. Had never used coconut sugar and it was surprisingly good. Is it truly Paleo? It seemed a bit more sweet than the honey and agave I have used prior in muffins so that was another plus. I’m pleased I happened onto your web site and am now a subscriber. Thanks for these great cookies!
Rachel…First, I never…well VERY rarely…less than 1x a year or two…post replies or anything on sites where I find my recipes. These cookies are just delicious! I make them for my house and they are the go-to cookie for us. We never want to wait for them to chill! I roll them into a cookie log, wrap them, and then stick them in the freezer for about 15-20 and then make a few! I keep the roll frozen and cut off “slices” whenever we want them! They freeze exceptionally well! I’m not a big fan of coconut sugar, so when I first made them, I mixed in Florida organic and they were good. I also do most vanilla recipes with 2-3 different kinds of vanilla, and these are no exception. I use Wilton clear vanilla extract, vanilla bean paste and good ole’ McCormick pure vanilla extract, which throw these cookies over the top. Now, I can use the coconut sugar as written and the sweetness is perfect. All that to say Thank you for creating + sharing this awesome recipe!
Archaeological research indicates that our Paleolithic ancestors gleaned the lion’s share of their calories and nutrition from meat, in stark comparison to modern day Western diets. Studies of today’s remaining hunter-gatherer societies show that meat and other animal products comprise a whopping 65% of their total caloric intake, whereas current day Western protein intakes average in at a measly 15% of total calories.
Nuts and seeds are rather popular snacks for both  Paleo and non-Paleo eaters.  If you aren’t careful, you can end up consuming quite a few of them because of their ease and convenience.  There’s also a whole host of health benefits you can get from nuts and seeds as most are loaded with nutrients.With high levels of antioxidants, nuts are cardio-protective and seeds on are packed with dietary fiber.   There are quite a few flavorful alternatives, sweet or savory, to consider as an alternative to your spoonful of nut butter or your handful of almonds.  Here’s a list of sweet and salty recipes to keep your tastebuds guessing and prevent boredom:
Low-Carb/Keto adaptation: Use granulated erythritol or xylitol sweetener in place of the coconut sugar and use low-carb chocolate chips or chunks. I chopped an entire Lily’s 70% chocolate bar, and it was a perfect amount. Nutritional info for low-carb option using erythritol + Lily’s 2.8oz 70% bar: (1 cookie) 3.1g net carbs | 119 calories | 2.8g protein | 10.9g fat
Juli, I made 5 of your recipes on Sunday. They were all wonderful. On the triple protein burgers I substituted Spicy Italian Sausage for the hot dogs. WOW!!!!! It was awesome….so was the Avocado Chorizo Sweet Potato Skins….that is now my favorite sweet potato recipe! When is the next cookbook coming out? Your first one is being delivered tomorrow…..your favorite recipe?
Many of you have tried some version of a stuffed vegetable at your meals such as a tuna-stuffed tomato or beef-stuffed peppers, but there is no reason why you can’t incorporate similar items into your snacks as part of your Paleo plan.  By rotating various colorful varieties of vegetables into your snacks, you’ll  be fueling your body with loads of vitamins, minerals, and anti-oxidants.  Stuffed vegetables can be made into gluten-free, grain-free, dairy-free snack options with a little creativity and advance preparation.  Definitely not taste-free, glance over some of the recipes listed below and see which one sounds like it might be a tasty addition to your snack rotation:
Pseudograins like quinoa, amaranth and buckwheat are less harmful but they are still dense sources of carbohydrates and contain similar antinutrients to grains. They should be prepared carefully to remove some of the anti-nutrients such as phytic acid. Soak such grains in salted water for 8-12 hours, rinse and then cook well before consuming. Chia seeds also fall in this category. Buckwheat is the safest out of these.
Oils are trickier. Loren Cordain, Ph.D., founder of The Paleo Diet Movement, breaks down which oils are healthy on the paleo diet: olive, walnut, flaxseed, macadamia, avocado and coconut oils are all allowed because they were gathered directly from the plant. While our hunter-gatherer ancestors probably did not consume flaxseed oil, it is allowed because of its content of high alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), a type of heart-healthy, anti-inflammatory omega-3 fatty acid.
Because of the simplicity of a paleo diet, it does not require participants to do too much thinking. While calories in versus calories out is the most basic rule to weight loss, a paleo diet takes a lot of thinking out of dieting. As long as you are eating whole, nutritious foods, you will probably find that weight loss will follow naturally—mainly because this style of eating cuts calories automatically.
So happy to hear you enjoyed the cookies, Jane! Coconut sugar is one of my favorites, and has a very low glycemic index so it doesn’t spike your blood sugar too much. It is a bit sweet, so you can definitely cut down on the sugar next time you make them if you taste buds prefer. Thanks so much for subscribing, I hope you find lots of recipes here to love.
This recipe does its best to replicate the chocolate Hostess brand donuts, but in a way that gets rid of the lousy ingredients and replaces them with wholesome ones. They contain wonderful things like medjool dates, eggs, and coconut flour, rather than what you’ll find in a package of Hostess donettes. The main ingredient in those is sugar, followed by partially hydrogenated vegetable oil which provides trans fat, and wheat flour. Not a good snack to get into the habit of eating, but these replicas won’t set you back.
Get yourself a top round roast and slice it as thinly as you can (or get your butcher to do it). The best jerky is made with just a few ingredients (but everyone’s taste buds are different). You’ll want to combine coconut aminos, some spices, and coconut sugar (yes, it isn’t totally Paleo; you can use honey instead). If you want the flavor that liquid smoke imparts, feel free to add it in. Put all the ingredients into a bowl, throw in the meat, stir it around, cover it, and put it in your fridge for at least 12 hours.

If you’re looking for a fresh fruit alternative, look no further than fruit leathers or fruit strips. This product can be found at most pharmacies, grocery stores, and even gas stations, but be careful because not all fruit leathers are good Paleo snacks. Check the list of ingredients on the back of the box carefully before purchasing. Your healthier fruit leather options will be those will minimal ingredients, like fruit and water. Stretch Island Fruit Co. makes great all-natural fruit leathers in a variety of flavors, like raspberry and strawberry, that Paleo bloggers and chefs love.
Contrary to popular belief, our body’s preferred source of fuel is fat, not carbohydrates. Therefore, quality fats are an important part of the paleo diet. Fats won’t make you fat. Instead, they’ll encourage your body to burn stored energy and can even contribute to reducing cravings for sweet, carbohydrate loaded foods. People who include some healthy fats with every meal have also been shown to eat less because fats are so inherently satisfying.

Rachel…First, I never…well VERY rarely…less than 1x a year or two…post replies or anything on sites where I find my recipes. These cookies are just delicious! I make them for my house and they are the go-to cookie for us. We never want to wait for them to chill! I roll them into a cookie log, wrap them, and then stick them in the freezer for about 15-20 and then make a few! I keep the roll frozen and cut off “slices” whenever we want them! They freeze exceptionally well! I’m not a big fan of coconut sugar, so when I first made them, I mixed in Florida organic and they were good. I also do most vanilla recipes with 2-3 different kinds of vanilla, and these are no exception. I use Wilton clear vanilla extract, vanilla bean paste and good ole’ McCormick pure vanilla extract, which throw these cookies over the top. Now, I can use the coconut sugar as written and the sweetness is perfect. All that to say Thank you for creating + sharing this awesome recipe!
There’s evidence that our ancestors pressed olives to make antioxidant-rich olive oil as far back as 7,000 years ago. Therefore, olive oil is considered to be a paleo ingredient and rightly so as it’s exceptional nutritional profile provides us with numerous benefits. With a unique mix of oleic acid and monounsaturated fatty acids, using olive oil raw or in low-heat cooking applications has been shown to decrease the risk of developing cancer, diabetes, osteoporosis and Alzheimer’s.
Here’s a great game day dip that you can serve up and feel like you’re having a real treat. Use one of the chip recipes on this page to scoop up this flavorful dip. It’s a sure winner when bacon and bleu cheese join spinach and artichokes. It’s like taken a proven success and adding two more delicious ingredients to it. You may want to drop the bleu cheese if you know for certain that you can’t handle any cheese, but many Paleo eaters will make an exception for a bit of cheese on occasion.

Pork rinds aren’t for everyone, but if you’re looking for a salty potato chip alternative, they might be just the ticket. But what exactly are pork rinds? Well, essentially pork rind is the skin of a pig, that when fried, boiled, and/or baked creates a crispy, airy chip-like consistency. Like potato chips, pork rinds also come in a bunch of different flavors, such as BBQ, salt and pepper, and cheese. Make sure to check the ingredients of store bought pork rinds, as only a handful are truly Paleo snacks.
Put them in the oven for about 5-7 minutes, then take them out and slightly flatten them with the back of a spatula. Put them back in the oven for about 5 more minutes, or until they look done. I like to take mine out RIGHT when I see just a hint of golden brown, which is one of the best baking tips that my aunt shared with me. If you do that, they won’t look done, but they are-and they’ll be soo soft and chewy. Even after they’ve cooled off!
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