I hate to the bearer of bad news here but I have to tell you that I completely understand your mental tactic in the whole superstitious thing. I do that too, but I call myself a realist, just to avoid the pessimist label. 😉 I always go worst-case scenario in my head and then when things go well, then I’m happy and if everything goes to hell in a hand basket then well, I’m ready for it!
I just found out that my friend has a nut allergy so I needed to alter a few recipes. After reading through a few paleo web pages, I’m finding that sunflower flour is a good 1:1 substitute for Almond flour. I’m testing that ratio with these cookies now. For a while, because of an issue with the amount of nuts that are “OK” for the diet I started substituted a home-made pumpkin seed flour and entree’s taste just as delicious!
Archaeological research indicates that our Paleolithic ancestors gleaned the lion’s share of their calories and nutrition from meat, in stark comparison to modern day Western diets. Studies of today’s remaining hunter-gatherer societies show that meat and other animal products comprise a whopping 65% of their total caloric intake, whereas current day Western protein intakes average in at a measly 15% of total calories.
This snack has Paleo written all over it. It has just the essential ingredients needed for a fried almond snack, and they’ve made this incredibly simple to follow. Almonds are one of the healthiest nuts you can eat, but sometimes they can get a little boring. By frying them you immediately improve the taste, and since they have you frying them in a Paleo approved oil you will be staying on the Paleo path. Rosemary is an herb that really goes nicely with almonds, but the ghee steals the show in terms of taste, giving the almonds a nice buttery flavor.
Dairy should mainly be avoided, especially if you suffer from gut problems and gluten intolerances, but if you’re in good health and have no sensitivities to lactose (sugars in milk) or casein (protein in milk) then a little healthy dairy can go a long way. Avoid cow’s milk as it has a high Glycemic Index unlike cheese or yogurt. Better options are goat’s and sheep’s milk products, A2 cow’s milk and cow’s milk fermented products like kefir, unsweetened yogurt, aged cheeses,  full fat cream, butter, and ricotta.
Protein is a staple of the caveman diet- specifically options that are grass-fed, wild caught or organic, as these options are often from animals raised in environments that encourage natural behavior. And because our ancestors didn't just live off chicken and beef, they hunted a wide variety of meat, the more variety you can add to your proteins, the better!
Archaeological research indicates that our Paleolithic ancestors gleaned the lion’s share of their calories and nutrition from meat, in stark comparison to modern day Western diets. Studies of today’s remaining hunter-gatherer societies show that meat and other animal products comprise a whopping 65% of their total caloric intake, whereas current day Western protein intakes average in at a measly 15% of total calories.

If you’ve been with me a long time, you know that Grams can not get enough of this drupe! Yep, I had to say drupe. One day, I might even achieve my lifelong dream of saying “drupe” out loud. Stay tuned. Anyway, I’ve dedicated these chocolate coconut bars, this paleo almond joy, friggin’ coconut chocolate chip ICE CREAM, and chocolate coconut truffles (!) to her. But by far, one of her very favorites was my paleo vegan coconut macaroons.
I hate to the bearer of bad news here but I have to tell you that I completely understand your mental tactic in the whole superstitious thing. I do that too, but I call myself a realist, just to avoid the pessimist label. 😉 I always go worst-case scenario in my head and then when things go well, then I’m happy and if everything goes to hell in a hand basket then well, I’m ready for it!
"Snacks can seem like a challenge," when you go paleo, admits registered dietitian Sonya Angelone, a spokeswoman for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. That's why you should keep the ingredients for these quick and easy paleo snacks on hand. Because TBH, even if cavemen didn't eat snacks, well, they also wielded clubs on the regular, so things are just different now.
These sweet and sour gummy candies are actually good for you. Pretty weird huh? They are really easy and actually a lot of fun to make. All you do is mix the ingredients, put them into a mold either by pouring or using a plastic bag with a small hole in the corner. Then either put them in the refrigerator or freezer to set depending on how big of a hurry you’re in. You could make them any shape or color you’d like. I’m thinking about making some for my Halloween party using these molds. Wilton Pumpkin Patch Silicone Mold, here is a Wilton Heart Mold. I suggest just searching around on Amazon for Wilton silicone mold and then the shape or holiday you’d like it for. I’m sure you can find just what you’re looking for.
Dark chocolate is chock-full of antioxidants and rich in good-for-you nutrients like healthy fats, iron, and magnesium. And while you can’t get those benefits from a sugary commercial candy bar, you can get them from these nibs made of pure organic cacao and nothing else. With no added sugar, these bites are a little bitter but perfect for hardcore dark chocolate fans.
Almond flour: Almond flour can often usually be replaced successfully with raw cashew flour. If you need to make these almond flour chocolate chip cookies nut-free, you can try replacing the almond flour with sunflower seed flour. They may take on a greenish tint, though, as the baking soda will activate the chlorophyll in the sunflower seeds, but it’s harmless.
Traditionally I’m not a huge fan of using several different gluten free flours in one recipes. I want the ingredients to be both accessible and have many different uses. So far, almond and coconut flour have become my go-tos (especially when it comes to paleo baking). If you find yourself looking for more recipes like these cookies, feel free to check out my paleo and grain free recipe categories!
This leafy green is packed full of essential nutrients including vitamin C, A, E, K, B6, folate, potassium, manganese, thiamin, riboflavin, calcium and iron, to name just a few. Because of this, broccoli is a great addition to almost any paleo meal and has also been shown to be particularly beneficial in reducing the risk of developing certain types of cancers due to its anti-inflammatory and detoxifying nature.
×